AIP German Sauerkraut

Fermenting seems to be all the rage in the culinary world. Where I live there is even a business that is all about fermenting with a slate of workshops on offer. Honestly I had never thought about making my own sauerkraut, but why not? The process is fairly simple, it just takes time. The finished product was better than sauerkraut i’ve had from the store. This is a pretty basic recipe, but have fun with it, add ingredients to make it your own!

AIP German Sauerkraut
Serves 6
Write a review
Print
Total Time
72 hr
Total Time
72 hr
Ingredients
  1. 1 medium head green cabbage (about 3 pounds)
  2. 1 1/2 tablespoons sea salt
  3. 2-quart wide-mouth canning jar (or two-quart mason jars)
Instructions
  1. Slice the cabbage. Discard the outer leaves of the cabbage. Remove the core. Slice into very thin ribbons.
  2. Combine the cabbage and salt. Transfer the cabbage to a large mixing bowl and sprinkle the salt over top. Begin working the salt into the cabbage by massaging and squeezing the cabbage with your hands. The cabbage will become watery and limp after about 5 minutes.
  3. Pack the cabbage into the jar. Take handfuls of the cabbage and pack them into the canning jar. Pour any liquid released by the cabbage while you were massaging it into the jar. Make sure the cabbage is fully submerged below the liquid.
  4. If necessary add a little filtered water to submerge it completely.
  5. Cover the mouth of the mason jar with a piece of cheesecloth and secure it with a rubber band or twine. This allows air to flow in and out of the jar, but prevents dust or insects from getting into the jar.
Press the cabbage every few hours
  1. Over the next 24 hours, press down on the cabbage every so often with a spoon.
  2. As the cabbage releases its liquid, it will become more limp and compact and the liquid will rise over the top of the cabbage.
  3. Ferment the cabbage for 3 to 10 days at a cool room temperature. 65-75 degrees.
  4. Check it daily and press it down if the cabbage is floating above the liquid.
  5. It is done when you like how it tastes.
  6. While it's fermenting, you may see bubbles coming through the cabbage, foam on the top, or white scum.
  7. These are normal and can be skimmed off the top either during fermentation or before refrigerating.
Paleo on the Go Test Kitchen http://blog.paleoonthego.com/

AIP German Brats

Ok I must confess, I loved these! Simple enough to make anytime of year, you don’t need to go through all the hassle of using casings and all that involves if you don’t want to. Just make patties like we did and fry them up! Make a big batch and freeze them for an easy meal at a later date. You should definitely try this at home!

AIP German Brats
Write a review
Print
Ingredients
  1. 2# ground pork
  2. 1/2# ground beef
  3. 2 tsp. coconut sugar
  4. 1 Tbl. Sea salt
  5. 1 tsp. mace
  6. ½ tsp. ground ginger
  7. 2 tsp. ground marjoram
  8. 4 ft. of hog casings (optional)
  9. Combine all ingredients in a bowl until well combined.
Instructions
  1. Combine all ingredients in a bowl until well combined.
If using casings
  1. Rinse casings well under running water. Tie a knot at one end. Using a sausage stuffing attachment on your meat grinder or sausage stuffer, thread the casing over the tip until it is all bunched up on the tip. Then slowly pipe the brat mixture into the casing, slowing letting the casing feed itself out onto your worktable. Every six inches, twist the brats to separate the links. Once the casing is filled, tie off the other end in a knot. Take a straight pin or skewer and prick tiny holes along the length of the brat. Bring 2 quarts of chicken stock to a simmer in a deep skillet. Gently lower the brat into the simmering liquid. Allow to cook at a very low simmer until cooked through (155 F). Remove carefully to cool. Before serving, heat some oil or fat in a skillet, slice the brat into serving lengths, and fry it in the skillet to brown on all sides.
If not using casings
  1. If don’t want to do all of the above work, just form the brat mixture into 3 oz patties and fry them in a little bacon fat or lard in a skillet until cooked through (155 F).
Paleo on the Go Test Kitchen http://blog.paleoonthego.com/

AIP Oktoberfest – Brats and Sauerkraut